(Kendrick Collection, TESHS)

Researched by Site Superintendent Cynde Georgen;

for presentation to the Big Horn City Historical Society, 2014


Today we’re going to talk about the family of a lady some of you may have known personally: Diana Cumming Kendrick. You might have liked her, you might have disliked her - people with strong personalities are often either loved or hated. But no matter how you might have felt about the lady herself, she came from a fascinating background.

At the Trail End State Historic Site, we address the basic facts of the marriage between Manville and Diana Kendrick thusly: 

In 1929, Harvard-graduate Manville Kendrick married Washington D. C. resident Diana Cumming, only daughter of United States Surgeon General Hugh Smith Cumming. Following a lengthy honeymoon trip from New York to San Francisco through the Panama Canal, they moved into Trail End, the Sheridan home of Manville’s father,  U. S. Senator John B. Kendrick, They lived in the home until 1961.

That's all well and good, but what else do we know about Diana and her family? Where did they come from and what did they do in life? What more do we know about Diana herself, for that matter. Turns out that we know quite a lot, including the fact that she and Manville had every intention of moving into a little home right here in Big Horn! Before we get to that, though, let’s take a look at her remarkable Southern lineage.


THE BOOTH FAMILY

Diana’s mother, Lucy Almira Booth, was born in July 1871 at her mother’s family home, “Hawthorne,” at Summit Point in Jefferson County, West Virginia. She was the eldest of seven children born to Dr. Edwin Gilliam Booth and Clara Haxall Thompson. In her memoirs, Lucy bemoaned that she could not claim Virginia nativity:

I was always deeply conscious that the proud boast, ‘Born in Virginia,’ was not to be mine, since though my mother was born in Virginia and in the same old house [and] in the same old room [in which] I made my ‘debut’ into life, in the intervening twenty-two years War and Reconstruction had torn this beautiful county of Jefferson from the Mother-State Virginia to form with many of her sisters the new state, West Virginia.

Though West-Virginia born, Lucy was raised in Virginia at her father’s ancestral home, a tobacco plantation in rural Nottoway County called Shenstone Farm. There, Lucy and her siblings were taught by a governess. In addition to more scholarly work, they also learned to play the piano, recite poems in a theatrical style, and even dance that “immoral round-dance” known as The Waltz. 

Lucy's father, Edwin Gilliam Booth, was born in 1839 at Shenstone Farm. He attended medical schools at the University of Virginia and the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He graduated from the latter in 1861, just in time to return to the South and enlist as a private in Company G of the Third Virginia Infantry. He served at the Battle of Big Bethel in June 1861, one of the earliest skirmishes of the war. A short time later, his medical skills were put to use as an assistant surgeon with the Confederate States Navy. He was aboard the CSS Selma when it was captured by Admiral David Farragut during the Battle of Mobile in August 1864. After a short stint as a prisoner of war, Edwin was paroled and sent back home. 

Following the war, Doctor Booth returned to Shenstone, where he married Clara Thompson and started a family. In 1886, they moved to Carter’s Grove near Williamsburg, Virginia. Carter’s Grove was purchased in 1885 by Doctor Booth’s father. The senior Booth – also named Edwin Gilliam – was a prominent attorney in both Virginia and Pennsylvania. Prior to the war, Booth served in the Virginia state legislature. In 1862, however, he made a radical move to the northern side of the Mason-Dixon line. According to his memoirs (which were written in the third person), "After having endured for a year, within sight of his own house, the clash of arms and the noise of war, Mr. Booth resolved to leave the Confederacy."

To go between Virginia and Pennsylvania in April 1863 was not an ordinary undertaking. To do so, he needed a presidential pass, which he received – from both presidents! As a respected legislator, learned attorney, and vocal advocate of the rights of prisoners of war, Booth was personally acquainted with most of the major players during the war, including military officers and politicians. In one thirty-day period, he had breakfast with Jefferson Davis at the Southern White House and dinner with President Lincoln at the Washington White House – the only civilian known to have done so. As noted in his memoirs, 

As a non-combatant, he had conducted himself without the least equivocation, concealment or insincerity, so that he might be able to command the confidence and consideration of both Presidents, from each of whom he obtained a permit to go on his way rejoicing.

In 1863, Booth married his second wife, respected Philadelphia heiress Henrietta Chauncey. Even after the purchase of Carter’s Grove in 1885, the Booths’ permanent home was in Pennsylvania, and it was there that Edwin G. Booth, Esquire, died in 1886 following a bout of spinal meningitis. 


The Booth family we’re talking about, by the way, is not connected in any way to that of the infamous John Wilkes Booth. The Southern sympathizer and presidential assassin did have a brother named Edwin – born in Maryland in 1833 – but this Edwin was a well-known Shakespearean actor. Both John and Edwin were the illegitimate sons of the English-born actor Junius Brutus Booth, who by 1822 was described as “the most prominent actor in America.” 

Although our Doctor Edwin Booth was not related to John Wilkes Booth, they did share similar sentiments regarding the President of the United States. While stationed near Mobile, Alabama, in April 1864, Dr. Booth wrote the following to his father in Philadelphia: 

I suppose there is much excitement at the North with regard to who shall be the next President – I do hope they will oust that dirty blackguard Abe Lincoln and all his corrupt Cabinet. What a contrast between our Noble Christian President – Jefferson Davis – and that man who calls himself the ‘President of the U. S.’ I wish I could get him within my hands. He wouldn’t feel much like a President then!


THE CUMMING FAMILY


Let’s leave the political musings of Dr. Booth now, and move on to the Cumming family. Diana’s paternal grandfather, Samuel Cumming, was only seven years old when his family emigrated from Scotland in 1823. Samuel lost his father while young and was raised in Baltimore, Maryland, by his strict Scotch Presbyterian mother. Trained as a stonemason, young Samuel worked on the fortifications for Virginia’s Fort Monroe. He later moved to Hampton and opened a store. 

Like so many of his Virginia brethren, Samuel Cumming was adversely impacted by the Civil War. An entry in the Journal of the U. S. House of Representatives from January 6, 1862, notes that Samuel petitioned the Union government, “requesting payment for goods destroyed by United States Forces” at Hampton in July 1861. 

Samuel’s first wife, Margaret, died prior to the start of the Civil War after giving birth to five children. His second wife was a young widowed schoolteacher named Diana Whiting Smith Armistead. Following their marriage in 1868, she bore Samuel at least two more children. 


Diana Kendrick’s father, Hugh Smith Cumming, was the eldest of those children. He was born in Hampton in 1869, and acquired his early education at Syms-Eaton Academy, one of the oldest public schools in America. After graduating from Baltimore City College, he attended the University of Virginia, graduating in 1893 with a degree in medicine. More than just a student, Hugh had an active social life as well. He was a member of the Chi Phi fraternity and was at one time elected the “most popular man in the university.” 

After a short stint in private practice, Hugh signed on with the United States Marine Hospital Service in 1894. This later became the U. S. Public Health Service. The scope of activities of the Marine Hospital Service, which were originally geared toward the care of merchant seamen, began to expand in the closing decades of the nineteenth century to include a variety of quarantine functions originally performed by state authorities. It was in this area of service that Hugh Smith Cumming made his mark.
 
Hugh’s first assignment was at the Staten Island Marine Hospital in New York. He was subsequently assigned to stations at Ellis Island, Philadelphia, Norfolk and Cape Fear, as well as ports in Mississippi and Louisiana. His assignments included medical inspection of returning troops and helping out during a major yellow fever epidemic. It was during this time that Hugh began his in-depth study of – and life-long fascination with – tropical diseases.

In June 1899, Doctor Cumming was placed in charge of the South Atlantic Quarantine Station off the coast of Georgia, on a little piece of land known as Blackbeard Island. Named for legendary pirate Edward “Blackbeard” Teach, Blackbeard Island was the largest federal marine quarantine station on the south Atlantic coast. It was here –beginning in 1883 – that infected ships, along with their cargoes and crews were detained, disinfected and fumigated. (Decommissioned in 1909 after the development of yellow fever vaccine by Doctor Walter Reed and other physicians, Blackbeard Island later became a wildlife refuge.)



THE BOOTH-CUMMING UNION

But let’s back up a little. In 1896, Hugh Smith Cumming took time out from his busy medical career to marry twenty-five year old Lucy Almira Booth. When they met, it was a case of love at first sight: she was playing the piano, he walked into the room, their eyes met, and the rest is history. They were married at Carter’s Grove. According to a local newspaper account, the Cumming-Booth wedding was “one of the most beautiful and picturesque weddings that has taken place in this vicinity for many years.” 

When Lucy walked down the stairs, she was accompanied by sixteen bridesmaids and two maids of honor. Lucy and Hugh were married beneath a banner emblazoned, “Happy is the Bride the Sun Shines On.”

Carter’s Grove, by the way, has a fascinating history all its own. A 750-acre farm on the James River, it was built in the mid-1700s for Carter Burwell, grandson of Robert "King" Carter, the wealthiest and most politically influential man in mid-18th-century Virginia. The main hall, in which Hugh and Lucy’s marriage was solemnized, measured twenty-two by twenty-seven feet and on one side was spanned by a fifteen foot arch at the end of the staircase. According to the newspaper, "Perhaps the handsomest and most effective feature of this great hall is the stairway, the balustrade of which is of mahogany, and bears the scars left upon it by the sabers of Tarleton’s troopers during the Revolutionary war." 

Purchased by Lucy’s grandfather in 1885 for $7,500, Carter’s Grove is considered one of the premier Georgian-style mansions still standing from Colonial Days. Owned and operated by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation from 1969 to 2007, Carter’s Grove is once again on the market. The asking price? A cool fifteen million dollars!


THE GYPSY LIFE


After the wedding, Hugh and Lucy returned to his duty station at Stapleton, New York. There they began their family. They eventually had three children, two of whom lived to adulthood. Their first-born, Lucy Booth Cumming, was born in Philadelphia in 1897, but died a short thirteen months later. Son Hugh Smith Cumming, Jr., was born in 1900 in Richmond, Virginia. Their final child, Clara Diana, made her appearance in June 1901 at the hospital on Blackbeard Island. 


The newest little Cumming was named for her two grandmothers, Clara Thomson and Diana Smith. She always hated the name Clara and refused to use it. Though she was “Diana” to most of the world, from almost the very start of her life she was known as “Bee” to her family and closest friends.

Diana and her brother were fated to live the nomadic gypsy life of a career government employee’s family. After five years in Georgia, Doctor Cumming was ordered to San Francisco, California, to serve as chief quarantine officer at the newly modernized Marine Service Station on Angel Island – located in the bay between San Francisco and Oakland. 

The facilities at Angel Island were state-of-the-art for the time. In addition to staff quarters and office buildings, there was a hospital for non-contagious cases, a compound for smallpox patients and another for those suspected of harboring plague and cholera germs. There were also three barracks for steerage passengers: two for Chinese immigrants and another for those from Japan. Well-to-do cabin passengers, of course, had their own building. 

Before a single passenger or sailor could disembark, every ship coming into the Port of San Francisco had to be inspected for disease. If any rats or signs of illness were found, all passengers had to leave the ship at Angel Island. Quarantined passengers had to wash with carbolic soap while their personal possessions were dipped in carbolic acid. Clothing and baggage were force-fed through a high pressure steam pipeline. 

Quarantined passengers were checked daily for disease and to make sure no one escaped. During these inspections, the rough wooden barracks were fumigated with sulphur dioxide and flushed out with salt water. The ships themselves were also disinfected by a variety of means which over the years included manganese, hydrochloric acid, sodium cyanide, formaldehyde, ammonia, sodium chlorate or sulphur dioxide. This was not pleasant work, but through their efforts, Dr. Cumming and his health officers were able to prevent a number of serious disease outbreaks, including bubonic plague, yellow fever, diphtheria and smallpox. 

In March 1906, Dr. Cumming was transferred to the Office of the United States Consulate General in Yokohama, Japan. He and his family boarded their ship, the Pacific Mail Steamer Manchuria, and sailed west – just one month before a devastating earthquake destroyed most of San Francisco and Oakland. While no major injuries or fatalities were reported on Angel Island, the quarantine station itself suffered considerable damage, thus making the Cummings’ departure particularly timely. 

Yokohama was Japan’s principal port at this time; in fact, most of the Japanese laborers that came to Sheridan County during the early years of the twentieth century shipped out of Yokohama, so they would have passed under the scrutiny of Doctor Cumming and his staff. Their job was to guard against the exportation of bubonic plague, cholera and other diseases to the United States. This reflected a change in government policy, wherein it was thought that if diseased persons and rat-infested ships could be caught before they reached America, the likelihood of preventing the spread of disease would be much greater and less effort would have to be spent in the type of quarantine procedures practiced at Angel Island. 

Christmas 1906 found the Cumming family in a foreign land, one which would seem to be far from the familiar trappings of home. But not so! According to what Lucy wrote in Diana’s baby book, the children went to five different Christmas tree parties during the 1906 holiday season, besides having their own little tree in their rooms at the Club Hotel in Yokohama. 

While in Japan, Diana began her formal schooling. According to her kindergarten report card, six-year-old Diana studied Writing, Reading, Numbers, French, Drawing, Sewing and Nature. She was also graded on conduct, punctuality, recitation, mats, building skills, story time, sand geography and brushwork! 

There was a sizable American community living in Yokohama at the time, so Hugh and Diana had plenty of other children with whom they could play. Because they could leave their children well-cared for, Hugh and Lucy took the opportunity to do some exploring in other parts of Asia. In addition to Nagasaki, Tokyo and Kobe, Japan, they traveled to China and Korea, visiting Peking, Seoul, the Great Wall and other landmarks. 



BACK TO THE STATES

After four years in Japan, Doctor Cumming was ordered back to the United States, where he was placed in charge of the Cape Charles Quarantine Station at Fort Monroe, Virginia. Once again, Lucy and the children packed up their belongings and boarded ship for a new port of call – which turned out to be aboard another ship! The Cummings’ first home back in America was aboard the USS Jamestown, anchored near Hampton Roads. The 1844 sloop had been moved to Fort Monroe in 1892 for use by the Marine Service. It was aboard the Jamestown that Diana and her family participated – quite by accident – in another once-in-a-lifetime event: 

On May 7th, 1910, Diana had a little friend to visit. The girl suffered from a severe toothache and woke everyone up in the middle of the night. It turned out to be a good thing, because when they went on deck at three a.m., the whole family looked to the sky to see … Halley’s Comet!

After their arrival in Virginia, Hugh and Diana were enrolled in school. They attended the West End Public School in Hampton and later the Force Grammar School in Washington DC. While her brother went off to the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Diana went to Western High School in Georgetown, Maryland, followed by a couple of years at the National Cathedral School in Washington. 

Diana proved to be a smart, popular and athletic girl. As a sophomore at Western, she joined the school’s rifle team, the only girl to do so. While at the National Cathedral school, she served as secretary of the Student Council. As one teacher noted in 1919, 

She is a girl of real ability and increasing power. Her classmates are growing to look upon her with confidence, and I have found her in the student council to be one in whose judgment I can rely. I agree with you that a girl with a mind such as hers should have the large intellectual vision which a college training can give.

But Diana didn’t go to college. After graduation in 1920, she worked at the Library of Congress and for Associated Charities. She became very active in the Junior League, Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Society for the Colonial Dames of America. She was an integral part of the Washington social set, taking part in charity events and fundraising theatrics. And, of course, she helped plan the annual Debutante Ball. 

Like most girls of her age, Diana was a debutante. Unlike most girls, however, she made her formal debut in three different cities: New Orleans, Louisiana; Charleston, South Carolina; and Washington, D. C. In December 1921, The Washington Times noted that Diana: “Had her coming out party on Monday afternoon. She’s a lovely girl, handsome and high bred and destined, I predict, to be a belle, as her mother was before her.” 

Before, during and after her debuts, Diana had a bevy of young men courting her day and night. She had a few light romances, but nothing too serious – at least not on her side. Several of the young men sent letters of desperation, some urging her towards exclusivity with them. But she would have none of it. The closest she came to giving her heart was with a young soldier named Dabney Maury, who presented her with his Croix de Guerre – a medal given to American soldiers by the French government in recognition of wartime bravery. Because she wasn’t serious about a long-term relationship with him, both her brother and her mother convinced her to return the medal – which she did, reluctantly.  


DIANA & MANVILLE


Now, we’re not exactly sure when Diana and Manville first met, but we know they spent time in each other’s company as early as 1923, when Manville’s first cousin, Eula Severn Williams, married Diana’s first cousin, Samuel Calvin Cumming (these two apparently met during one of Miss Williams’ frequent trips to Washington to visit the Kendricks). The Cumming and Kendrick families lived on the same street and Diana occasionally joined her mother on social calls to the Kendrick apartment. It was no doubt during this time that the relationship between Manville and Diana began to flourish. 

The first Cumming to meet a Kendrick may have been Diana’s father. In September 1920, Hugh came to Sheridan on an inspection tour of Fort Mackenzie. Here he met John Kendrick and … well, let’s let Hugh’s letter to Lucy, written that night from his room at the Sheridan Inn, tell of his experience: 


I have just now – 10 p.m. – come into this famous old hotel of Buffalo Bill’s from a delightful bachelor dinner at Senator Kendrick’s magnificent house near here. The house is in beautiful gardens on a bold bluff overlooking the town, the valley and across to wonderful mountains, the Big Horns. … The house is in perfect taste, the dining room in mahogany paneling, the sitting room raftered, a big Davenport English fashion in front of a great wood fire.

In 1926, Diana traveled to Sheridan to spend a few weeks with Manville and Rosa-Maye at the Kendrick ranches. Here she fell in love with the west – and Manville, too. The romance between this blue-blooded debutante and her Harvard-educated cowboy was tailor-made for publicity. The courtship delighted society editors who were always looking for fresh faces and interesting stories to put before a gossip-hungry public. Frequent accounts in the Washington and New York newspapers detailed Manville’s extended visits to Washington and Diana’s fun-filled excursions to Wyoming. 

Diana had grown from a gangly girl in a sailor suit to the epitome of a 1920s fashion plate. Although she could never be described as the most beautiful woman in the world, she was striking in a way that suited the sensibilities of the 1920s. When Manville and Diana married in 1929, their nuptials were the highlight of the social season. First Lady Grace Coolidge was in attendance, as were a bevy of Washington politicians and diplomats – along with several Sheridan and Big Horn residents. 


Following their lengthy honeymoon trip through the Panama Canal to San Francisco, Manville and Diana moved to Sheridan and into the mansion on the hill known as Trail End. Although they lived there for nearly thirty-two years, the young couple never wanted to make Trail End their permanent home. Diana in particular wished to have a home of her own, away from the frequently conflicting demands of her husband and his mother. Eula Kendrick once told Manville that it was natural for Diana to want her own home where she could "fill her time with attention to the little homey details all brides love and can entertain her friends at will, which after all is the only form of amusement Sheridan offers." 

But Eula didn’t want the couple moving farther away than across the street! She offered at one time to have the upstairs of the Carriage House fixed up as an apartment for them, but quickly backed off when they actually showed interest in the plan. Whenever the youngsters made noises about moving, Eula “took to her bed” with some ailment or another, always requiring the constant ministrations of her children to get well. Even though they purchased land in Big Horn and had detailed house plans drawn up, in the end Manville and Diana abandoned such dreams and stayed at Trail End until Eula’s death in 1961.

To escape from her mother-in-law’s relatively benevolent yet oppressive household rule, Diana spent a great deal of time with her friends in Big Horn – the Wallops, Moores, Beufs, Carnahans, Cranes and Walshes. She learned to fly her own plane, kept up her shooting skills on the pheasant range, took tap dance lessons, hosted charity bridge tournaments, raised her children, and stayed active with the DAR and the Colonial Dames. Diana had a family heritage to be proud of, and she knew it.



HUGH SMITH CUMMING, JUNIOR

As for Diana’s brother, Hugh Smith Cumming, Jr., while she was living in the wilds of Wyoming, he was making a name for himself in both military and diplomatic circles. As a student at the Virginia Military Institute, he had been sent overseas to fight during World War One. He returned to graduate from VMI in 1920, after which he attained a law degree from the University of Virginia. Afterwards, he joined the Diplomatic Corps, serving in Singapore and Peking from 1924 to 1927, in Sweden from 1947 to 1950, and in the Soviet Union from 1950 to 1952. In between, he completed a variety of special missions in Scandinavia, England, India, Greenland and Switzerland.

From 1953 to 1957, Hugh Junior served as Ambassador to Indonesia. It was a challenging time to be in such a position. New countries were forming and many of them were showing a bent towards Communism. While some members of the diplomatic and political establishment were advocating the quashing of such independent thinking on the part of these small countries, Cumming stated publicly that he felt that their voices should be heard and encouraged. 

This was apparently a case of smoke and mirrors, however, as in 1957 he received a new job title, Director of the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research. According to once scholar, this meant that Cumming was “a liaison officer between the State Department and the CIA” charged “by Secretary of State Dulles in mid-1957 with fashioning a new, covert interventionist policy toward Indonesia.”


Hugh and his bride, California native Winifred Burney West, married in 1935 and stayed that way until her death in 1978. Hugh passed away without issue in 1986, thus ending his particular line of the Cumming family. 


SURGEON GENERAL HUGH SMITH CUMMING


Diana’s parents had some interesting times as well. About the time Diana graduated from high school, her father’s career took a giant leap forward. During World War One, he had been detailed to the office of the Surgeon General of the Navy, ordered to report on sanitary conditions at military camps and embarkation points in France and elsewhere. As travel restrictions were relaxed following the war, the danger of infection from abroad was intensified. Therefore, Doctor Cumming was assigned to conduct sanitation studies at European ports. It was during one of these inspection trips – at Rome in 1920 – that Cumming received a cable announcing his appointment as Surgeon General of the Public Health Service – a post he would hold for four successive terms.

One of his earliest jobs as was to help the newly formed Veterans Bureau take over the medical and psychiatric care of World War One veterans. One of the sites under consideration for a hospital was Sheridan’s Fort Mackenzie – the same fort Doctor Cumming had toured in 1920. Following that visit, he told The Sheridan Post,

My inspection of Fort Mackenzie has convinced me beyond a doubt that it is most excellently fitted and situated for the purposes which we have in mind. … You may rest assured something will be done in a very short time now, in order that the grounds and buildings may be prepared for occupancy before winter sets in. 

As with most major undertakings of this sort, things didn’t move as fast or as smoothly as the doctor would have liked. To begin with, the army said it didn’t want to part with Mackenzie – despite the fact that it was officially abandoned as a post in November 1918. But, as Doctor Cumming noted to Senator Kendrick shortly after returning to Washington, 

I regret to say that the War Department feels unwilling to transfer Fort Mackenzie to [the Health] Service for use as a hospital, in view of the fact that they consider it one of their most important posts. I do not know whether they can be induced to change their minds with reference to this matter.

It took some wrangling and finagling on the parts of both Cumming and Kendrick, but in April 1922, the first patients were finally admitted to the 300-bed hospital at Fort Mackenzie. 


To help Americans become more aware of health-related issues, Cumming broadcast weekly health talks over America’s airwaves. Along with frequent newspaper articles, these broadcasts informed the public about the start of new cancer studies, the discovery of spotted fever vaccines, the regulation of hazardous substances, and other programs begun under the auspices of the Surgeon General’s office. 

But not every program was positive. It was also during Cumming’s tenure that syphilis studies were conducted on African-Americans in Tuskegee, Alabama, in which some four hundred black men were subjected to scientific scrutiny without their knowledge and without adequate treatment. Begun in 1930, the study was not discontinued until 1973, at which point it was finally deemed unethical.

After Doctor Cumming left office in 1936 and retired from active duty with the Public Health Service, he remained a health ambassador to the world. Continuing his focus on tropical diseases, he served as Director of the Pan American Sanitary Bureau until 1947, and was on the Health Committee of the League of Nations. Throughout his career, Lucy stayed by Hugh’s side. She moved her family whenever she had to and, after the children were grown and on their own, traveled around the world where ever Hugh’s job took him. They celebrated their fiftieth Anniversary in 1946, two years before Hugh’s death. Lucy lived on until 1960, doting on her children and grandchildren. 



CONCLUSION

Diana and Manville were married for fifty-eight years, raising two sons, John and Hugh, at Trail End. Although Hugh passed away in 1952 as the result of a swimming accident, John and his descendants are frequent visitors to the old family home in Sheridan as well as the family cabin at Dome Lake in the Bighorn Mountains. 

From the tobacco fields of western Virginia to the halls of the nation’s capital, a study of the combined Booth-Cumming families provides an excellent view into many aspects of both American history and local history. I think you’ll agree, after hearing their stories, that these people led pretty extraordinary lives! 

Hugh & Lucy Cumming with their children, Hugh Jr. and Diana (Kendrick Collection, TESHS)

The Cumming Family

Trail End

 State Historic Site